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Sewing connections: visual and web identity for YO SOY MODA | 2014
YO SOY MODA, spanish for I AM FASHION, a pioneer event for the fashion sphere, takes place for the first time in Andalusia to connect, to share and exchange knowledge among all the leading agents belonging to fashion in every of its fields: from production to design, wholesales, critics or users.
A thread, the smallest physical element fashion can be reduced, serves as a visual tool to define the event identity, its logotype and every supporting material. An element that also helps us to navigate throughout the website, that drives us along the written documents, that links every single piece playing a important role in this game: from participants to logotype letters. An element used virtual and literally to draw, write, sail, and mainly, to connect.


Here some hands-on work in progress:



All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Sewing connections: visual and web identity for YO SOY MODA | 2014

YO SOY MODA, spanish for I AM FASHION, a pioneer event for the fashion sphere, takes place for the first time in Andalusia to connect, to share and exchange knowledge among all the leading agents belonging to fashion in every of its fields: from production to design, wholesales, critics or users.

A thread, the smallest physical element fashion can be reduced, serves as a visual tool to define the event identity, its logotype and every supporting material. An element that also helps us to navigate throughout the website, that drives us along the written documents, that links every single piece playing a important role in this game: from participants to logotype letters. An element used virtual and literally to draw, write, sail, and mainly, to connect.


Here some hands-on work in progress:



All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Materiality: study, creation, production | 2013-2014
Material creation is essential for architecture, interiors and design projects. This personal research has served for clients such as Dior Parfums, Neutra Ediciones and Prada among others.
The versatile use of found fabrics with brand-new personal textile designs, in combination with other different type of matters, produce very personal and well-orientated results acording to needs, identity and function. A game of transitions, fadings, foldings, textures…












All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Materiality: study, creation, production | 2013-2014

Material creation is essential for architecture, interiors and design projects. This personal research has served for clients such as Dior Parfums, Neutra Ediciones and Prada among others.

The versatile use of found fabrics with brand-new personal textile designs, in combination with other different type of matters, produce very personal and well-orientated results acording to needs, identity and function. A game of transitions, fadings, foldings, textures…

All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Geometrical ‘subtractions’ or how to draw patterns on fabrics without adding | 2012
(*This series of 4 textile pieces has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)




Inspired by these previous paper samples, I felt curious to try the effect of this process on textiles. Testing the same idea on a piece of fabric, different effects are achieved, but in this case, due to the material itself. Removing or simply moving lines in the piece of fabric shapes and changes the configuration of the tissue.




When moving only several threads within the piece of textile and leaving the rest in their normal position, new areas, surfaces, shapes, textures and alterations of its previous two-dimensionality appear in the weft. Here a capture of details on fabrics:

Mentored by Aldo Bakker. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Geometrical ‘subtractions’ or how to draw patterns on fabrics without adding | 2012

(*This series of 4 textile pieces has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)

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Inspired by these previous paper samples, I felt curious to try the effect of this process on textiles. Testing the same idea on a piece of fabric, different effects are achieved, but in this case, due to the material itself. Removing or simply moving lines in the piece of fabric shapes and changes the configuration of the tissue.

image

image

image

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When moving only several threads within the piece of textile and leaving the rest in their normal position, new areas, surfaces, shapes, textures and alterations of its previous two-dimensionality appear in the weftHere a capture of details on fabrics:

image

Mentored by Aldo BakkerAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.


My Graduation master thesis ‘UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action’ on show in the following events and venues:
- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.
- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.
- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.


"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

My Graduation master thesis ‘UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action’ on show in the following events and venues:

- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.

- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.

- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.

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"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.


UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (1/3) | 2012
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)
Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.
One of the objects resulting from the thesis research is a blanket, a piece which starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. This big accumulation of material impedes the blanket to be normally used in principle. Its original thickness does not allow to have a soft and flexible textile rug to wrap yourself with it, but when matter is slowly taken away, the blanket starts to gain movement, losing its stiffness. By picking away at the cloth, it is transformed into a functional blanket.

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…

















All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (1/3) | 2012

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)

Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.

One of the objects resulting from the thesis research is a blanket, a piece which starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. This big accumulation of material impedes the blanket to be normally used in principle. Its original thickness does not allow to have a soft and flexible textile rug to wrap yourself with it, but when matter is slowly taken away, the blanket starts to gain movement, losing its stiffness. By picking away at the cloth, it is transformed into a functional blanket.

image

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (2/3) | 2012
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)
Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.
One of the objects resulting from the research is a chair, but in the beginning is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing material of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair since the chair itself is virtually inside; using your hands, breaking and taking away, the volume generated will change with every removal action, and the chair will begin to appear as this manual action is performed.

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…















All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (2/3) | 2012

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)

Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.

One of the objects resulting from the research is a chair, but in the beginning is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing material of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair since the chair itself is virtually inside; using your hands, breaking and taking away, the volume generated will change with every removal action, and the chair will begin to appear as this manual action is performed.

image

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (3/3) | 2012
A research on ‘creating by taking away’ is gathered in a thesis book that follows this ‘removal’ concept in its cover design, inner graphics and page layouts. For instance, in order to discover the title, a stripe of material must be manually torn and removed from the front cover following the pre-cut lines; the pile of pages composing the book is honestly shown by the simple sheer-glued binding system; handmade cutouts detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…



A graphic storytelling (along with an oral speech) that serves to present and communicate the research is another supporting element that arises from this project. From dug architectures, until reaching that moment when a mental space is more suitable for our current well-being, the concept of ‘removing’ is present in all those stages throughout our history on finding protection as human beings: making caves or emptying our mind. This concept of ‘removing’ is applied also to the visual presentation that tells the content of this thesis research in a summarized way. Starting with a compact block of images, these lose intensity on the set as they serve and complement the oral speech. The whole block disappears when the presentation reaches its end. 

The index of the research and some captures from the printed version of the book are shown next. The complete thesis research book can be digitally read on-line by following this link (copyright protected, all rights reserved).
(+) Architecture has its origins in the primitive efforts of mankind to provide protection against inclement weather, wild beasts and human enemies. Since the first thing men look for as a refuge is an enclosed space where they can make themselves comfortable, it seems natural that most of the early architecture are excavated. Given a solid block of matter, man instinctively tends to carve it to feel protected inside. But nowadays, dangers are more complex, subtle and mental. The sort of removal action of earlier days to hide from the outside world is no longer suitable. Whenever man’s needs for protection change, the response to these needs evolves too, but throughout history, the responses have had one thing in common: the innate protective action of taking away matter, in soil, in garments or in one’s busy mind, has an interesting healing effect. To remove ‘matter’ is never an easy task to do. It is a process that has to be intensive and done constantly, creating an emotional link between person and result by means of a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment. Therefore, I do not propose a design of a single object but a process that is applied to them, a process that provides time to self-reflect and think, performing an action that is necessary to slowly find out the hidden function of the piece and make use of it. Hence, one finds a virtual mental protection for our fragile well-being by means of using this removal action rather than the final obtained result.













All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (3/3) | 2012

A research on ‘creating by taking away’ is gathered in a thesis book that follows this ‘removal’ concept in its cover design, inner graphics and page layouts. For instance, in order to discover the title, a stripe of material must be manually torn and removed from the front cover following the pre-cut lines; the pile of pages composing the book is honestly shown by the simple sheer-glued binding system; handmade cutouts detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…

image

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A graphic storytelling (along with an oral speech) that serves to present and communicate the research is another supporting element that arises from this project. From dug architectures, until reaching that moment when a mental space is more suitable for our current well-being, the concept of ‘removing’ is present in all those stages throughout our history on finding protection as human beings: making caves or emptying our mind. This concept of ‘removing’ is applied also to the visual presentation that tells the content of this thesis research in a summarized way. Starting with a compact block of images, these lose intensity on the set as they serve and complement the oral speech. The whole block disappears when the presentation reaches its end.
 

image


The index of the research and some captures from the printed version of the book are shown next. The complete thesis research book can be digitally read on-line by following this link (copyright protected, all rights reserved).

(+) Architecture has its origins in the primitive efforts of mankind to provide protection against inclement weather, wild beasts and human enemies. Since the first thing men look for as a refuge is an enclosed space where they can make themselves comfortable, it seems natural that most of the early architecture are excavated. Given a solid block of matter, man instinctively tends to carve it to feel protected inside. But nowadays, dangers are more complex, subtle and mental. The sort of removal action of earlier days to hide from the outside world is no longer suitable. Whenever man’s needs for protection change, the response to these needs evolves too, but throughout history, the responses have had one thing in common: the innate protective action of taking away matter, in soil, in garments or in one’s busy mind, has an interesting healing effect. To remove ‘matter’ is never an easy task to do. It is a process that has to be intensive and done constantly, creating an emotional link between person and result by means of a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment. Therefore, I do not propose a design of a single object but a process that is applied to them, a process that provides time to self-reflect and think, performing an action that is necessary to slowly find out the hidden function of the piece and make use of it. Hence, one finds a virtual mental protection for our fragile well-being by means of using this removal action rather than the final obtained result.

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

'Unless…' business cards | 2012



In order to provide my contact details when my pieces of the ‘Unless you remove' project are exhibited at different venues, I have created a business card that works with the 'removal' concept as well, following again the whole story of 'subtraction' behind this project. The details on the card are intentionally covered with pencil traces, so the use of an eraser is necessary to find out the hidden text in it. By means of this solution, a mental connection is instantly built between the exhibited pieces and the business card, resulting in an effective and direct element for the project to be remembered.
Here some previous try-outs testing and exploring the ‘subtractive’ action:








All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

'Unless…' business cards | 2012

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In order to provide my contact details when my pieces of the ‘Unless you remove' project are exhibited at different venues, I have created a business card that works with the 'removal' concept as well, following again the whole story of 'subtraction' behind this project. The details on the card are intentionally covered with pencil traces, so the use of an eraser is necessary to find out the hidden text in it. By means of this solution, a mental connection is instantly built between the exhibited pieces and the business card, resulting in an effective and direct element for the project to be remembered.

Here some previous try-outs testing and exploring the ‘subtractive’ action:

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

CV

Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, designer (MDes: master on Social Design, 2010-2012, Design Academy Eindhoven, the Netherlands) and architect (BArch/MArch: bachelor and master in Architecture, 2011-2008, School of Architecture in the University of Seville, Spain).

Living in Paris / Eindhoven / Seville.
 

(Download the complete CV in French / CV in English / CV in Spanish)


Spanish sunlight | 2010
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)



The effect of the Spanish light inside a room is quite characteristic, due to the blinds every window has to protect the inner space of the room from the Sun. But when living in cities where the Sun is not as present as in Spain, we can miss it. This quilt cover has a silkscreened printing that emulates the traces produced by the Sun passing through the Spanish blinds.

Instead of designing a source of light that reproduces the Sun of Spain, I have decided to play with its effect. Two different patterns are silkscreen-printed in a plain bed linen, patterns that each one is made out of two kind of paint, sun-sense and glow-in-the-dark. Using inks which react with light or with the lack of it, the presence of the sunlight and its potential is much more perceptible, since one of the layers is only seen when direct light is pointing at it, and the other one when there is no longer a source of light on. With this silkcreened bed linen, the Spanish sunlight feels much closer, for it produces the sensation given by the shadows of the blinds, essential protective objects in Spain to calm down the Sun inside the rooms.



Here, some more detailed pictures of the final silkscreened piece:





Mentor: Jan Boelen. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Spanish sunlight | 2010

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)

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The effect of the Spanish light inside a room is quite characteristic, due to the blinds every window has to protect the inner space of the room from the Sun. But when living in cities where the Sun is not as present as in Spain, we can miss it. This quilt cover has a silkscreened printing that emulates the traces produced by the Sun passing through the Spanish blinds.

image

Instead of designing a source of light that reproduces the Sun of Spain, I have decided to play with its effect. Two different patterns are silkscreen-printed in a plain bed linen, patterns that each one is made out of two kind of paint, sun-sense and glow-in-the-dark. Using inks which react with light or with the lack of it, the presence of the sunlight and its potential is much more perceptible, since one of the layers is only seen when direct light is pointing at it, and the other one when there is no longer a source of light on. With this silkcreened bed linen, the Spanish sunlight feels much closer, for it produces the sensation given by the shadows of the blinds, essential protective objects in Spain to calm down the Sun inside the rooms.

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Here, some more detailed pictures of the final silkscreened piece:

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Mentor: Jan BoelenAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.


Bending a piece of paper | 2010
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)


When living in small rooms or apartments, it is not easy to host a friend and make their short stay more comfortable. This temporary small bedside table for our guests allows to place the travelling guide and light a candle before falling asleep after a long tourist day. It is made out of thin white steel sheet, bent several times in friendly shapes like a piece of paper.

The object, to serve as a bedside table, must be necessarily open and attached below the guest’s mattress, otherwise due to its particular shape it does not stay still, thus its function is limited to its use. When it is not attached, this is when the guest is not over the mattress, the object can be close and saved apart. Evoking the cross sections of metal beams which are self-supporting construction elements for buildings as they provide themselves their own function, I manufactured this piece in white steel sheet, bent carefully by hand, getting the most neutral object that fits every different personalities of our guests, with a circular bas-relief that fixes the candles. The bedside table creates a comfortable temporary enviroment around itself, making a spot that is only for our guest, his/her small personal space inside our house.







Mentor: Dick van Hoff. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Bending a piece of paper | 2010

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)

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When living in small rooms or apartments, it is not easy to host a friend and make their short stay more comfortable. This temporary small bedside table for our guests allows to place the travelling guide and light a candle before falling asleep after a long tourist day. It is made out of thin white steel sheet, bent several times in friendly shapes like a piece of paper.

image

The object, to serve as a bedside table, must be necessarily open and attached below the guest’s mattress, otherwise due to its particular shape it does not stay still, thus its function is limited to its use. When it is not attached, this is when the guest is not over the mattress, the object can be close and saved apart. Evoking the cross sections of metal beams which are self-supporting construction elements for buildings as they provide themselves their own function, I manufactured this piece in white steel sheet, bent carefully by hand, getting the most neutral object that fits every different personalities of our guests, with a circular bas-relief that fixes the candles. The bedside table creates a comfortable temporary enviroment around itself, making a spot that is only for our guest, his/her small personal space inside our house.

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Mentor: Dick van HoffAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

LandLinescape: Invisible infrastructure of ideas | 2011
(*Project exhibited at the show ‘Landscape in perspective’ organised by Naim/Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg, held in Maastricht, the Netherlands, from october 2011 to february 2012.)

Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.







The five series of the “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:
*Man-made line series



*Nature-made line series



*Trips series






*Personal intervention series



*Mapping series





(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?
Here, the entire research booklet:

Mentored by Rianne Makkink. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

LandLinescape: Invisible infrastructure of ideas | 2011

(*Project exhibited at the show ‘Landscape in perspective’ organised by Naim/Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg, held in Maastricht, the Netherlands, from october 2011 to february 2012.)

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Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.

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The five series of the “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:

*Man-made line series

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*Nature-made line series

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*Trips series

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*Personal intervention series

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*Mapping series

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(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?

Here, the entire research booklet:

Mentored by Rianne Makkink. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Atlas of Limburg: Landschap in Perspectief | 2011

The ‘Landschapsproject’ is an initiative commissioned by the cooperation of Marres Centre for Contemporary Culture, NAiM, Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg. The project is focused on the landscape of Limburg, not strictly in the visual sense but rather as the ‘invisible infrastructure of ideas and concepts’. We have been asked to map out and research different perspectives and create a route, either metaphorical or literal, that reveals the identity of this region.
Here some of the pages:












Mentored by Joost Grootens. Involved designers: Daniela Dossi, Joao Abreu Valente, Karianne Rygh, Yu-Hun Kim, Elena Pereira, Han Decorte, Irma Földényi, Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, Lynn Schammel, Tamar Shafrir, Aleksandra Szymanska, Alexandra Proba, Anna Badur and Lina-Marie Köppen.

Atlas of Limburg: Landschap in Perspectief | 2011

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The ‘Landschapsproject’ is an initiative commissioned by the cooperation of Marres Centre for Contemporary Culture, NAiM, Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg. The project is focused on the landscape of Limburg, not strictly in the visual sense but rather as the ‘invisible infrastructure of ideas and concepts’. We have been asked to map out and research different perspectives and create a route, either metaphorical or literal, that reveals the identity of this region.

Here some of the pages:

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Mentored by Joost Grootens. Involved designers: Daniela Dossi, Joao Abreu Valente, Karianne Rygh, Yu-Hun Kim, Elena Pereira, Han Decorte, Irma Földényi, Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, Lynn Schammel, Tamar Shafrir, Aleksandra Szymanska, Alexandra Proba, Anna Badur and Lina-Marie Köppen.

My mental ‘home’ | 2012
What sort of protection does a person need nowadays? A physical one? Or a more psychical and subtle one? Trying to give response to these questions, I set this textile installation at home serving as practical scenario to get inspired and provide personal hands-on conclusions…

The trip on protection that men has been seeking, from dug architecture to garments -and skin and mental states as further steps- reaches its other extreme point and is completed by this mental protection that one is able to find, stated as probably our current most effective and virtual means to feel safe and calm again. The reasons throughout the history have been very different, therefore, the solutions, features and qualities of the protective space and the material where it is built are such as well, however always with the same goal and function, and done guided by our instincts.



The practice of Yoga helps to disconnect, remove all one’s thoughts, empty one’s head in order to find a mental extremely private state. There is a place where one can take refuge, a place inside oneself, a place to which no one else has access, a place that no one can destroy. To access that place there is yoga, an ancient technique. It’s a place where one will find peace, where one will find tranquility, freedom. But one must practice it continuously, intensely, assiduously and dutifully, and then one will achieve it, and will be free. Interestingly, a series of drawings made by French-American artist and sculptor Louise Bourgeois under the name of Femme Maison can give a visual expression to this mental sort of protection: a woman body whose head is replaced literally by a house. The female figure has a dual appearance because it is surmounted by a construction, a sort of house, that covers and imprisons the head. Symbolic drawings that reproduce a strange creature.
Therefore, it is a mental place not easy and rapid to build; it is not a place that one gets immediately, but a constant and intensive work and practice is needed to reach it. The only way to achieve this place is by means of deleting one’s worries, problems, distractions, restlessness… which I consider a mental diligent removal action. This non-short and non-easy-reachable task is always present, and necessary I would say. An effort -physical to carve caves in mountains or mental to empty our mind- that the person has to make to get his or her personal result. The making by removing, this effort that implies a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment is important and crucial in order to consolidate a stronger link, a special individual emotional connection, between result and the user who has created it. One reaches that state as a result of one’s personal effort.

Here some images from the setting-up:
All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

My mental ‘home’ | 2012

What sort of protection does a person need nowadays? A physical one? Or a more psychical and subtle one? Trying to give response to these questions, I set this textile installation at home serving as practical scenario to get inspired and provide personal hands-on conclusions…

image

The trip on protection that men has been seeking, from dug architecture to garments -and skin and mental states as further steps- reaches its other extreme point and is completed by this mental protection that one is able to find, stated as probably our current most effective and virtual means to feel safe and calm again. The reasons throughout the history have been very different, therefore, the solutions, features and qualities of the protective space and the material where it is built are such as well, however always with the same goal and function, and done guided by our instincts.

image

image

imageimage

The practice of Yoga helps to disconnect, remove all one’s thoughts, empty one’s head in order to find a mental extremely private state. There is a place where one can take refuge, a place inside oneself, a place to which no one else has access, a place that no one can destroy. To access that place there is yoga, an ancient technique. It’s a place where one will find peace, where one will find tranquility, freedom. But one must practice it continuously, intensely, assiduously and dutifully, and then one will achieve it, and will be free. Interestingly, a series of drawings made by French-American artist and sculptor Louise Bourgeois under the name of Femme Maison can give a visual expression to this mental sort of protection: a woman body whose head is replaced literally by a house. The female figure has a dual appearance because it is surmounted by a construction, a sort of house, that covers and imprisons the head. Symbolic drawings that reproduce a strange creature.

Therefore, it is a mental place not easy and rapid to build; it is not a place that one gets immediately, but a constant and intensive work and practice is needed to reach it. The only way to achieve this place is by means of deleting one’s worries, problems, distractions, restlessness… which I consider a mental diligent removal action. This non-short and non-easy-reachable task is always present, and necessary I would say. An effort -physical to carve caves in mountains or mental to empty our mind- that the person has to make to get his or her personal result. The making by removing, this effort that implies a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment is important and crucial in order to consolidate a stronger link, a special individual emotional connection, between result and the user who has created it. One reaches that state as a result of one’s personal effort.

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Here some images from the setting-up:

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Conceptual ‘removals’ or how to express a concept with a drawing (*RE·MO·VALS [noun]: the actions of taking away, moving, carrying away someone or something) | 2012
(*This series of 4 charcoal drawings has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)




Training myself on communicating visually and easily a concept, these charcoal drawings are the result of my wordless attempts. In this case, the concept I have selected is ‘taking away’ and its extended meaning that goes beyond eliminate. This idea is shown by starting from a compact squared surface, a solid black block composed by a pile of horizontal lines drawn with a piece of charcoal; the concept of ‘removal’ is then expressed by applying the simply action of displacing the lines, one by one, from that previous block. This is, if moving only several lines and leaving untouched the others, different shapes like circles, triangles or rectangles can be drawn, transforming the original square, depending on how long each of the lines is displaced, expressing therefore my personal believing that ‘removing’ means way much more than just ‘eliminating’. Important is to say that the action of moving each line must be done carefully, slowly, with precision… These drawings find inspiration on my grandmother’s way to decorate her tablecloths, a traditional handmade technique called ‘hemstitch’ or ‘hem-stitch’ (known as ‘vainicas’ in Spanish) where threads are removed by hand from the piece of fabric to decorate the resulting loose areas.

Here some captures of the making process of the charcoal drawings:




Mentored by Aldo Bakker. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Conceptual ‘removals’ or how to express a concept with a drawing (*RE·MO·VALS [noun]: the actions of taking away, moving, carrying away someone or something) | 2012

(*This series of 4 charcoal drawings has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)

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Training myself on communicating visually and easily a concept, these charcoal drawings are the result of my wordless attempts. In this case, the concept I have selected is ‘taking away’ and its extended meaning that goes beyond eliminate. This idea is shown by starting from a compact squared surface, a solid black block composed by a pile of horizontal lines drawn with a piece of charcoal; the concept of ‘removal’ is then expressed by applying the simply action of displacing the lines, one by one, from that previous block. This is, if moving only several lines and leaving untouched the others, different shapes like circles, triangles or rectangles can be drawn, transforming the original square, depending on how long each of the lines is displaced, expressing therefore my personal believing that ‘removing’ means way much more than just ‘eliminating’. Important is to say that the action of moving each line must be done carefully, slowly, with precision… These drawings find inspiration on my grandmother’s way to decorate her tablecloths, a traditional handmade technique called ‘hemstitch’ or ‘hem-stitch’ (known as ‘vainicas’ in Spanish) where threads are removed by hand from the piece of fabric to decorate the resulting loose areas.

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Here some captures of the making process of the charcoal drawings:

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Mentored by Aldo BakkerAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Sewing connections: visual and web identity for YO SOY MODA | 2014
YO SOY MODA, spanish for I AM FASHION, a pioneer event for the fashion sphere, takes place for the first time in Andalusia to connect, to share and exchange knowledge among all the leading agents belonging to fashion in every of its fields: from production to design, wholesales, critics or users.
A thread, the smallest physical element fashion can be reduced, serves as a visual tool to define the event identity, its logotype and every supporting material. An element that also helps us to navigate throughout the website, that drives us along the written documents, that links every single piece playing a important role in this game: from participants to logotype letters. An element used virtual and literally to draw, write, sail, and mainly, to connect.


Here some hands-on work in progress:



All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Sewing connections: visual and web identity for YO SOY MODA | 2014

YO SOY MODA, spanish for I AM FASHION, a pioneer event for the fashion sphere, takes place for the first time in Andalusia to connect, to share and exchange knowledge among all the leading agents belonging to fashion in every of its fields: from production to design, wholesales, critics or users.

A thread, the smallest physical element fashion can be reduced, serves as a visual tool to define the event identity, its logotype and every supporting material. An element that also helps us to navigate throughout the website, that drives us along the written documents, that links every single piece playing a important role in this game: from participants to logotype letters. An element used virtual and literally to draw, write, sail, and mainly, to connect.


Here some hands-on work in progress:



All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Materiality: study, creation, production | 2013-2014
Material creation is essential for architecture, interiors and design projects. This personal research has served for clients such as Dior Parfums, Neutra Ediciones and Prada among others.
The versatile use of found fabrics with brand-new personal textile designs, in combination with other different type of matters, produce very personal and well-orientated results acording to needs, identity and function. A game of transitions, fadings, foldings, textures…












All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Materiality: study, creation, production | 2013-2014

Material creation is essential for architecture, interiors and design projects. This personal research has served for clients such as Dior Parfums, Neutra Ediciones and Prada among others.

The versatile use of found fabrics with brand-new personal textile designs, in combination with other different type of matters, produce very personal and well-orientated results acording to needs, identity and function. A game of transitions, fadings, foldings, textures…

All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Geometrical ‘subtractions’ or how to draw patterns on fabrics without adding | 2012
(*This series of 4 textile pieces has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)




Inspired by these previous paper samples, I felt curious to try the effect of this process on textiles. Testing the same idea on a piece of fabric, different effects are achieved, but in this case, due to the material itself. Removing or simply moving lines in the piece of fabric shapes and changes the configuration of the tissue.




When moving only several threads within the piece of textile and leaving the rest in their normal position, new areas, surfaces, shapes, textures and alterations of its previous two-dimensionality appear in the weft. Here a capture of details on fabrics:

Mentored by Aldo Bakker. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Geometrical ‘subtractions’ or how to draw patterns on fabrics without adding | 2012

(*This series of 4 textile pieces has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)

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Inspired by these previous paper samples, I felt curious to try the effect of this process on textiles. Testing the same idea on a piece of fabric, different effects are achieved, but in this case, due to the material itself. Removing or simply moving lines in the piece of fabric shapes and changes the configuration of the tissue.

image

image

image

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When moving only several threads within the piece of textile and leaving the rest in their normal position, new areas, surfaces, shapes, textures and alterations of its previous two-dimensionality appear in the weftHere a capture of details on fabrics:

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Mentored by Aldo BakkerAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.


My Graduation master thesis ‘UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action’ on show in the following events and venues:
- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.
- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.
- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.


"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

My Graduation master thesis ‘UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action’ on show in the following events and venues:

- It has been exhibited at the show ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven during Dutch Design Week 2012.

- It has been presented by Neutra Ediciones at ‘JustMad: Emerging Art Fair’ in Madrid from February 14th to 17th, 2013.

- It has been shown as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.

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"Usually creating an object involves the addition of material. In this project by Luis Gómez Barquín, it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preference. In ‘Unless you Remove’, he has applied this method to a chair and a rug, but stresses that the idea can be applied to almost anything. In the beginning, his chair is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing parts of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair. In the same way, Barquín’s blanket starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. By picking away at the cloth it is transformed into a functional blanket. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. Barquín believes that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. ‘People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from the object, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter’, he says”.

Credits: this quoted text by Annemarie Hoeve; art direction of these two pictures by Petra Janssen; these two photographs by Femke Rijerman. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.


UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (1/3) | 2012
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)
Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.
One of the objects resulting from the thesis research is a blanket, a piece which starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. This big accumulation of material impedes the blanket to be normally used in principle. Its original thickness does not allow to have a soft and flexible textile rug to wrap yourself with it, but when matter is slowly taken away, the blanket starts to gain movement, losing its stiffness. By picking away at the cloth, it is transformed into a functional blanket.

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…

















All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (1/3) | 2012

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)

Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.

One of the objects resulting from the thesis research is a blanket, a piece which starts off as a heavy, inflexible, thick mound of woven textiles. This big accumulation of material impedes the blanket to be normally used in principle. Its original thickness does not allow to have a soft and flexible textile rug to wrap yourself with it, but when matter is slowly taken away, the blanket starts to gain movement, losing its stiffness. By picking away at the cloth, it is transformed into a functional blanket.

image

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (2/3) | 2012
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)
Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.
One of the objects resulting from the research is a chair, but in the beginning is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing material of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair since the chair itself is virtually inside; using your hands, breaking and taking away, the volume generated will change with every removal action, and the chair will begin to appear as this manual action is performed.

(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…















All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (2/3) | 2012

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Up Close, Wide Open’ in Eindhoven in October 2012, at ‘JustMad 4: emerging art fair’ in Madrid in February 2013, and at the show ‘Diseño a Secas’ in the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013 / Featured on July 2013 issue of VISION Magazine, China.)

Usually creating an object involves the addition of material; in this project it’s the other way around. It is all about removing the excess to slowly tailor it to individual preferences. My graduation thesis project for my Master studies in the Social Design programme at the Design Academy Eindhoven, deals on the inspiring topic of creating by taking away, resulting in a family of objects and a thesis book gathering the complete research.

One of the objects resulting from the research is a chair, but in the beginning is not a chair yet. It simply has the potential to become a chair. It is a cube made up of layer upon layer of thin perforated wood. Only by removing material of the layers, does it slowly ‘degenerate’ into a chair since the chair itself is virtually inside; using your hands, breaking and taking away, the volume generated will change with every removal action, and the chair will begin to appear as this manual action is performed.

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(+) Ancient architecture was purely for protection. Against weather, animals or human enemies. It was done by removing soil or excavating rocks. Ancient garments were also made by removing. A fleece from a sheep, a bark from a tree. These were remade, all this needed focus and dedication. But today’s dangers and lifestyle are more complex and subtle, so products as well as garments are way beyond those ancient pieces. However, we lost the skill of removal. We constantly add. But we can learn, and remove. Focus again, reflect, commit. That’s why I have designed pieces that will become ours by removing material from them, ‘objects that ask for an action’, I call them, for it’s part of the questions we have to ask ourselves: what do we really need, what can go? I have applied this method to a chair and a blanket, but stress that the idea can be applied to almost anything. This process has been designed to take time. Lots of time. I believe that relatively simple, repetitive tasks have a healing effect. People nowadays think too much. Every time you physically remove something from these objects, it’s like getting rid of some mental clutter. The blanket is too thick to wrap yourself comfortably unless… The chair has no room to sit on unless…

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (3/3) | 2012
A research on ‘creating by taking away’ is gathered in a thesis book that follows this ‘removal’ concept in its cover design, inner graphics and page layouts. For instance, in order to discover the title, a stripe of material must be manually torn and removed from the front cover following the pre-cut lines; the pile of pages composing the book is honestly shown by the simple sheer-glued binding system; handmade cutouts detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…



A graphic storytelling (along with an oral speech) that serves to present and communicate the research is another supporting element that arises from this project. From dug architectures, until reaching that moment when a mental space is more suitable for our current well-being, the concept of ‘removing’ is present in all those stages throughout our history on finding protection as human beings: making caves or emptying our mind. This concept of ‘removing’ is applied also to the visual presentation that tells the content of this thesis research in a summarized way. Starting with a compact block of images, these lose intensity on the set as they serve and complement the oral speech. The whole block disappears when the presentation reaches its end. 

The index of the research and some captures from the printed version of the book are shown next. The complete thesis research book can be digitally read on-line by following this link (copyright protected, all rights reserved).
(+) Architecture has its origins in the primitive efforts of mankind to provide protection against inclement weather, wild beasts and human enemies. Since the first thing men look for as a refuge is an enclosed space where they can make themselves comfortable, it seems natural that most of the early architecture are excavated. Given a solid block of matter, man instinctively tends to carve it to feel protected inside. But nowadays, dangers are more complex, subtle and mental. The sort of removal action of earlier days to hide from the outside world is no longer suitable. Whenever man’s needs for protection change, the response to these needs evolves too, but throughout history, the responses have had one thing in common: the innate protective action of taking away matter, in soil, in garments or in one’s busy mind, has an interesting healing effect. To remove ‘matter’ is never an easy task to do. It is a process that has to be intensive and done constantly, creating an emotional link between person and result by means of a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment. Therefore, I do not propose a design of a single object but a process that is applied to them, a process that provides time to self-reflect and think, performing an action that is necessary to slowly find out the hidden function of the piece and make use of it. Hence, one finds a virtual mental protection for our fragile well-being by means of using this removal action rather than the final obtained result.













All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

UNLESS YOU REMOVE: Objects that ask for an action (3/3) | 2012

A research on ‘creating by taking away’ is gathered in a thesis book that follows this ‘removal’ concept in its cover design, inner graphics and page layouts. For instance, in order to discover the title, a stripe of material must be manually torn and removed from the front cover following the pre-cut lines; the pile of pages composing the book is honestly shown by the simple sheer-glued binding system; handmade cutouts detail and represent some of the objects that form the family of pieces resulting from the project -a lamp, a chair, a blanket- by removing material from several sheets of superimposed semi-transparent papers…

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A graphic storytelling (along with an oral speech) that serves to present and communicate the research is another supporting element that arises from this project. From dug architectures, until reaching that moment when a mental space is more suitable for our current well-being, the concept of ‘removing’ is present in all those stages throughout our history on finding protection as human beings: making caves or emptying our mind. This concept of ‘removing’ is applied also to the visual presentation that tells the content of this thesis research in a summarized way. Starting with a compact block of images, these lose intensity on the set as they serve and complement the oral speech. The whole block disappears when the presentation reaches its end.
 

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The index of the research and some captures from the printed version of the book are shown next. The complete thesis research book can be digitally read on-line by following this link (copyright protected, all rights reserved).

(+) Architecture has its origins in the primitive efforts of mankind to provide protection against inclement weather, wild beasts and human enemies. Since the first thing men look for as a refuge is an enclosed space where they can make themselves comfortable, it seems natural that most of the early architecture are excavated. Given a solid block of matter, man instinctively tends to carve it to feel protected inside. But nowadays, dangers are more complex, subtle and mental. The sort of removal action of earlier days to hide from the outside world is no longer suitable. Whenever man’s needs for protection change, the response to these needs evolves too, but throughout history, the responses have had one thing in common: the innate protective action of taking away matter, in soil, in garments or in one’s busy mind, has an interesting healing effect. To remove ‘matter’ is never an easy task to do. It is a process that has to be intensive and done constantly, creating an emotional link between person and result by means of a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment. Therefore, I do not propose a design of a single object but a process that is applied to them, a process that provides time to self-reflect and think, performing an action that is necessary to slowly find out the hidden function of the piece and make use of it. Hence, one finds a virtual mental protection for our fragile well-being by means of using this removal action rather than the final obtained result.

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

'Unless…' business cards | 2012



In order to provide my contact details when my pieces of the ‘Unless you remove' project are exhibited at different venues, I have created a business card that works with the 'removal' concept as well, following again the whole story of 'subtraction' behind this project. The details on the card are intentionally covered with pencil traces, so the use of an eraser is necessary to find out the hidden text in it. By means of this solution, a mental connection is instantly built between the exhibited pieces and the business card, resulting in an effective and direct element for the project to be remembered.
Here some previous try-outs testing and exploring the ‘subtractive’ action:








All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

'Unless…' business cards | 2012

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In order to provide my contact details when my pieces of the ‘Unless you remove' project are exhibited at different venues, I have created a business card that works with the 'removal' concept as well, following again the whole story of 'subtraction' behind this project. The details on the card are intentionally covered with pencil traces, so the use of an eraser is necessary to find out the hidden text in it. By means of this solution, a mental connection is instantly built between the exhibited pieces and the business card, resulting in an effective and direct element for the project to be remembered.

Here some previous try-outs testing and exploring the ‘subtractive’ action:

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

CV

Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, designer (MDes: master on Social Design, 2010-2012, Design Academy Eindhoven, the Netherlands) and architect (BArch/MArch: bachelor and master in Architecture, 2011-2008, School of Architecture in the University of Seville, Spain).

Living in Paris / Eindhoven / Seville.
 

(Download the complete CV in French / CV in English / CV in Spanish)


Spanish sunlight | 2010
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)



The effect of the Spanish light inside a room is quite characteristic, due to the blinds every window has to protect the inner space of the room from the Sun. But when living in cities where the Sun is not as present as in Spain, we can miss it. This quilt cover has a silkscreened printing that emulates the traces produced by the Sun passing through the Spanish blinds.

Instead of designing a source of light that reproduces the Sun of Spain, I have decided to play with its effect. Two different patterns are silkscreen-printed in a plain bed linen, patterns that each one is made out of two kind of paint, sun-sense and glow-in-the-dark. Using inks which react with light or with the lack of it, the presence of the sunlight and its potential is much more perceptible, since one of the layers is only seen when direct light is pointing at it, and the other one when there is no longer a source of light on. With this silkcreened bed linen, the Spanish sunlight feels much closer, for it produces the sensation given by the shadows of the blinds, essential protective objects in Spain to calm down the Sun inside the rooms.



Here, some more detailed pictures of the final silkscreened piece:





Mentor: Jan Boelen. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Spanish sunlight | 2010

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)

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The effect of the Spanish light inside a room is quite characteristic, due to the blinds every window has to protect the inner space of the room from the Sun. But when living in cities where the Sun is not as present as in Spain, we can miss it. This quilt cover has a silkscreened printing that emulates the traces produced by the Sun passing through the Spanish blinds.

image

Instead of designing a source of light that reproduces the Sun of Spain, I have decided to play with its effect. Two different patterns are silkscreen-printed in a plain bed linen, patterns that each one is made out of two kind of paint, sun-sense and glow-in-the-dark. Using inks which react with light or with the lack of it, the presence of the sunlight and its potential is much more perceptible, since one of the layers is only seen when direct light is pointing at it, and the other one when there is no longer a source of light on. With this silkcreened bed linen, the Spanish sunlight feels much closer, for it produces the sensation given by the shadows of the blinds, essential protective objects in Spain to calm down the Sun inside the rooms.

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Here, some more detailed pictures of the final silkscreened piece:

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Mentor: Jan BoelenAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.


Bending a piece of paper | 2010
(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)


When living in small rooms or apartments, it is not easy to host a friend and make their short stay more comfortable. This temporary small bedside table for our guests allows to place the travelling guide and light a candle before falling asleep after a long tourist day. It is made out of thin white steel sheet, bent several times in friendly shapes like a piece of paper.

The object, to serve as a bedside table, must be necessarily open and attached below the guest’s mattress, otherwise due to its particular shape it does not stay still, thus its function is limited to its use. When it is not attached, this is when the guest is not over the mattress, the object can be close and saved apart. Evoking the cross sections of metal beams which are self-supporting construction elements for buildings as they provide themselves their own function, I manufactured this piece in white steel sheet, bent carefully by hand, getting the most neutral object that fits every different personalities of our guests, with a circular bas-relief that fixes the candles. The bedside table creates a comfortable temporary enviroment around itself, making a spot that is only for our guest, his/her small personal space inside our house.







Mentor: Dick van Hoff. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Bending a piece of paper | 2010

(*Piece commercialized by Neutra Ediciones / Exhibited at the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville in June 2013.)

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When living in small rooms or apartments, it is not easy to host a friend and make their short stay more comfortable. This temporary small bedside table for our guests allows to place the travelling guide and light a candle before falling asleep after a long tourist day. It is made out of thin white steel sheet, bent several times in friendly shapes like a piece of paper.

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The object, to serve as a bedside table, must be necessarily open and attached below the guest’s mattress, otherwise due to its particular shape it does not stay still, thus its function is limited to its use. When it is not attached, this is when the guest is not over the mattress, the object can be close and saved apart. Evoking the cross sections of metal beams which are self-supporting construction elements for buildings as they provide themselves their own function, I manufactured this piece in white steel sheet, bent carefully by hand, getting the most neutral object that fits every different personalities of our guests, with a circular bas-relief that fixes the candles. The bedside table creates a comfortable temporary enviroment around itself, making a spot that is only for our guest, his/her small personal space inside our house.

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Mentor: Dick van HoffAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

LandLinescape: Invisible infrastructure of ideas | 2011
(*Project exhibited at the show ‘Landscape in perspective’ organised by Naim/Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg, held in Maastricht, the Netherlands, from october 2011 to february 2012.)

Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.







The five series of the “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:
*Man-made line series



*Nature-made line series



*Trips series






*Personal intervention series



*Mapping series





(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?
Here, the entire research booklet:

Mentored by Rianne Makkink. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

LandLinescape: Invisible infrastructure of ideas | 2011

(*Project exhibited at the show ‘Landscape in perspective’ organised by Naim/Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg, held in Maastricht, the Netherlands, from october 2011 to february 2012.)

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Sunken lanes, hollow roads, military fortifications, highways, former defensive walls, harvesting lands… nature or man-made lines within the countryside of Maastricht where the landscape can be discovered on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. A forgotten large-scale “linescape” with a strong sculptural character that makes you feel really embraced by nature, in direct contact with earth, inside a big piece of non-deliberate landart. A personal research on “linescape” given expression to a series of postcards -a mapping series, a lines series, a personal intervention series and a trip series- that will travel by mail around the world, looking for being promoted, discovered and experienced as a reference of a unique landscape of The Netherlands.

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The five series of the “linescape” postcard collection are shown next:

*Man-made line series

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*Nature-made line series

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*Trips series

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*Personal intervention series

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*Mapping series

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(+) Impressed by the sunken lanes around Maastricht, my project is not about “landscape” but “linescape”.  I find it very artistic and sculpture-related. I have gone several times to Maastricht and surroundings to check personally these sunken lanes in the landscape but also other “man-made” lines that I consider very related to each other, such as the military fort of Maastricht or the former defensive wall of the city. I was taking pictures every 30 steps while I was making these promenades to express the feelings you have when you follow these lines, and how you are discovering the landscape on a sequence, sometimes you are higher, sometimes you are lower. In each line, I found something interesting in one point (invisible landmarks) because a line is made out of points: a small chapel, a water fountain… So, how can I highlight the landscape of Limburg and put it into value? What if this area is in a way a big artwork of Michael Heizer for instance? And what if in the end I make a point intervention on one point of one of these lines that embodies and reflects even more this sculpture character and the rest of the features, such as the feeling of been embraced by nature, direct contact with earth, partially vision of the landscape, etc.?

Here, the entire research booklet:

Mentored by Rianne Makkink. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Atlas of Limburg: Landschap in Perspectief | 2011

The ‘Landschapsproject’ is an initiative commissioned by the cooperation of Marres Centre for Contemporary Culture, NAiM, Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg. The project is focused on the landscape of Limburg, not strictly in the visual sense but rather as the ‘invisible infrastructure of ideas and concepts’. We have been asked to map out and research different perspectives and create a route, either metaphorical or literal, that reveals the identity of this region.
Here some of the pages:












Mentored by Joost Grootens. Involved designers: Daniela Dossi, Joao Abreu Valente, Karianne Rygh, Yu-Hun Kim, Elena Pereira, Han Decorte, Irma Földényi, Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, Lynn Schammel, Tamar Shafrir, Aleksandra Szymanska, Alexandra Proba, Anna Badur and Lina-Marie Köppen.

Atlas of Limburg: Landschap in Perspectief | 2011

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The ‘Landschapsproject’ is an initiative commissioned by the cooperation of Marres Centre for Contemporary Culture, NAiM, Bureau Europa and the Province of Limburg. The project is focused on the landscape of Limburg, not strictly in the visual sense but rather as the ‘invisible infrastructure of ideas and concepts’. We have been asked to map out and research different perspectives and create a route, either metaphorical or literal, that reveals the identity of this region.

Here some of the pages:

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Mentored by Joost Grootens. Involved designers: Daniela Dossi, Joao Abreu Valente, Karianne Rygh, Yu-Hun Kim, Elena Pereira, Han Decorte, Irma Földényi, Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, Lynn Schammel, Tamar Shafrir, Aleksandra Szymanska, Alexandra Proba, Anna Badur and Lina-Marie Köppen.

My mental ‘home’ | 2012
What sort of protection does a person need nowadays? A physical one? Or a more psychical and subtle one? Trying to give response to these questions, I set this textile installation at home serving as practical scenario to get inspired and provide personal hands-on conclusions…

The trip on protection that men has been seeking, from dug architecture to garments -and skin and mental states as further steps- reaches its other extreme point and is completed by this mental protection that one is able to find, stated as probably our current most effective and virtual means to feel safe and calm again. The reasons throughout the history have been very different, therefore, the solutions, features and qualities of the protective space and the material where it is built are such as well, however always with the same goal and function, and done guided by our instincts.



The practice of Yoga helps to disconnect, remove all one’s thoughts, empty one’s head in order to find a mental extremely private state. There is a place where one can take refuge, a place inside oneself, a place to which no one else has access, a place that no one can destroy. To access that place there is yoga, an ancient technique. It’s a place where one will find peace, where one will find tranquility, freedom. But one must practice it continuously, intensely, assiduously and dutifully, and then one will achieve it, and will be free. Interestingly, a series of drawings made by French-American artist and sculptor Louise Bourgeois under the name of Femme Maison can give a visual expression to this mental sort of protection: a woman body whose head is replaced literally by a house. The female figure has a dual appearance because it is surmounted by a construction, a sort of house, that covers and imprisons the head. Symbolic drawings that reproduce a strange creature.
Therefore, it is a mental place not easy and rapid to build; it is not a place that one gets immediately, but a constant and intensive work and practice is needed to reach it. The only way to achieve this place is by means of deleting one’s worries, problems, distractions, restlessness… which I consider a mental diligent removal action. This non-short and non-easy-reachable task is always present, and necessary I would say. An effort -physical to carve caves in mountains or mental to empty our mind- that the person has to make to get his or her personal result. The making by removing, this effort that implies a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment is important and crucial in order to consolidate a stronger link, a special individual emotional connection, between result and the user who has created it. One reaches that state as a result of one’s personal effort.

Here some images from the setting-up:
All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

My mental ‘home’ | 2012

What sort of protection does a person need nowadays? A physical one? Or a more psychical and subtle one? Trying to give response to these questions, I set this textile installation at home serving as practical scenario to get inspired and provide personal hands-on conclusions…

image

The trip on protection that men has been seeking, from dug architecture to garments -and skin and mental states as further steps- reaches its other extreme point and is completed by this mental protection that one is able to find, stated as probably our current most effective and virtual means to feel safe and calm again. The reasons throughout the history have been very different, therefore, the solutions, features and qualities of the protective space and the material where it is built are such as well, however always with the same goal and function, and done guided by our instincts.

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The practice of Yoga helps to disconnect, remove all one’s thoughts, empty one’s head in order to find a mental extremely private state. There is a place where one can take refuge, a place inside oneself, a place to which no one else has access, a place that no one can destroy. To access that place there is yoga, an ancient technique. It’s a place where one will find peace, where one will find tranquility, freedom. But one must practice it continuously, intensely, assiduously and dutifully, and then one will achieve it, and will be free. Interestingly, a series of drawings made by French-American artist and sculptor Louise Bourgeois under the name of Femme Maison can give a visual expression to this mental sort of protection: a woman body whose head is replaced literally by a house. The female figure has a dual appearance because it is surmounted by a construction, a sort of house, that covers and imprisons the head. Symbolic drawings that reproduce a strange creature.

Therefore, it is a mental place not easy and rapid to build; it is not a place that one gets immediately, but a constant and intensive work and practice is needed to reach it. The only way to achieve this place is by means of deleting one’s worries, problems, distractions, restlessness… which I consider a mental diligent removal action. This non-short and non-easy-reachable task is always present, and necessary I would say. An effort -physical to carve caves in mountains or mental to empty our mind- that the person has to make to get his or her personal result. The making by removing, this effort that implies a personal dedication of time, energy and commitment is important and crucial in order to consolidate a stronger link, a special individual emotional connection, between result and the user who has created it. One reaches that state as a result of one’s personal effort.

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Here some images from the setting-up:

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All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Conceptual ‘removals’ or how to express a concept with a drawing (*RE·MO·VALS [noun]: the actions of taking away, moving, carrying away someone or something) | 2012
(*This series of 4 charcoal drawings has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)




Training myself on communicating visually and easily a concept, these charcoal drawings are the result of my wordless attempts. In this case, the concept I have selected is ‘taking away’ and its extended meaning that goes beyond eliminate. This idea is shown by starting from a compact squared surface, a solid black block composed by a pile of horizontal lines drawn with a piece of charcoal; the concept of ‘removal’ is then expressed by applying the simply action of displacing the lines, one by one, from that previous block. This is, if moving only several lines and leaving untouched the others, different shapes like circles, triangles or rectangles can be drawn, transforming the original square, depending on how long each of the lines is displaced, expressing therefore my personal believing that ‘removing’ means way much more than just ‘eliminating’. Important is to say that the action of moving each line must be done carefully, slowly, with precision… These drawings find inspiration on my grandmother’s way to decorate her tablecloths, a traditional handmade technique called ‘hemstitch’ or ‘hem-stitch’ (known as ‘vainicas’ in Spanish) where threads are removed by hand from the piece of fabric to decorate the resulting loose areas.

Here some captures of the making process of the charcoal drawings:




Mentored by Aldo Bakker. All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

Conceptual ‘removals’ or how to express a concept with a drawing (*RE·MO·VALS [noun]: the actions of taking away, moving, carrying away someone or something) | 2012

(*This series of 4 charcoal drawings has been exhibited as part of the exhibition ‘Diseño a secas’ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporáneo in Seville on June 8th-9th, 2013.)

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Training myself on communicating visually and easily a concept, these charcoal drawings are the result of my wordless attempts. In this case, the concept I have selected is ‘taking away’ and its extended meaning that goes beyond eliminate. This idea is shown by starting from a compact squared surface, a solid black block composed by a pile of horizontal lines drawn with a piece of charcoal; the concept of ‘removal’ is then expressed by applying the simply action of displacing the lines, one by one, from that previous block. This is, if moving only several lines and leaving untouched the others, different shapes like circles, triangles or rectangles can be drawn, transforming the original square, depending on how long each of the lines is displaced, expressing therefore my personal believing that ‘removing’ means way much more than just ‘eliminating’. Important is to say that the action of moving each line must be done carefully, slowly, with precision… These drawings find inspiration on my grandmother’s way to decorate her tablecloths, a traditional handmade technique called ‘hemstitch’ or ‘hem-stitch’ (known as ‘vainicas’ in Spanish) where threads are removed by hand from the piece of fabric to decorate the resulting loose areas.

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Here some captures of the making process of the charcoal drawings:

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Mentored by Aldo BakkerAll works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved.

CV

About:

Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne, designer and architect.

lannelenne.hola@gmail.com
(FR) 0033 695713947, (ES) 0034 667660806, (NL) 0031 685213430

Feel free to reach me by email or telephone. You can also "Ask me anything" or explore my design references on www.seed-s.tumblr.com as well.
All works © Luis Gómez-Barquín Lanne-Lenne. All rights reserved; do not use or reproduce without the expressed written consent from the author.